Beautiful Architectural Trench (Channel) Gratings

One of the most fundamental needs of any modern city is the drainage system. The drainage system protects the modern city from flood damage by draining excess water away. How the modern day drainage system works is that during rain, some water naturally seeps into the ground while the rest makes it way through the city’s drainage system via its network of drains, into rivers and ultimately to the bays or seas through storm water beach outlets.

As large amount of rain water can accumulate quickly during heavy storm or rain, without a proper draining system, this excess water can flow towards low lands which can cause floods and damages to lives and properties. As a result, any modern city requires a fully functioning drainage system that can safely drain excess storm water from built-up areas into rivers and creeks.

Storm water usually runs off the city’s properties (through the roofs), through house gutters and into the residential and commercial drains which are connected to the roads or streets’ drains. These drains will direct the water into regional drains which eventually drains the storm water into the nearest creeks or rivers.

Maintenance of drains and storm water infrastructure connecting to the rivers have to be regularly maintained to ensure that the drainage network remains functional at all times.

In our modern days, underground drainage systems are designed to cope with frequent storms where any excess water always travels along the planned drainage flow paths to carry the excess water from properties to prevent flooding. Carefully planned drainage systems also factor in the impact the drainage system has on our natural rivers and creeks to ensure that litter items like bottles, plastic bags and other wastes are prevented from being washed into rivers and seas.

Storm water drains are out of bound to unauthorized personnel as entering storm water drains is extremely dangerous and usually illegal. Conditions in a drain can change without warning as water levels might rise suddenly even on a dry sunny day as rainwater can arrive all of a sudden even having fallen many kilometers away.

While most storm water drains are covered by grates and grilles, not all stormwater drains can be covered as this would restrict the water flow in certain areas due to the buildup of debris and litter which eventually leads to flooding.

Among the most fundamental requirements of any modern city is the drainage system. The drain system protects the modern-day city from flood damage by draining excess water away. How the modern day drain system works is that during rain, some water naturally permeates into the ground while the rest makes it way through the city’s drainage system via its network of drainage, into rivers and ultimately to the bays or seas through storm water beach outlets.

As big amount of rain can accumulate quickly throughout a heavy storm or rain, without a proper drainage system, this excess water can flow towards low lands which can cause floods and damages to lives and homes. As a result, any modern-day city requires a totally functioning drain system that can safely drain excess storm water from built-up areas into rivers and creeks.

Storm water normally runs off the city’s properties (through the roofings), through house gutters and into the domestic and commercial drains which are linked to the streets or roadways’ drains. These drains will direct the water into local drains which ultimately drains the storm water into the closest rivers or creeks.

Upkeep of drainage system and storm water infrastructure linking to the rivers have to be regularly maintained to ensure that the drainage network remains practical at all times.

In our modern days, underground drain systems are developed to handle regular storms where any excess water constantly travels along the planned drain flow paths to carry the excess water from residential or commercial properties to prevent flooding. Thoroughly planned drainage systems likewise factor in the effect the drainage system has on our natural rivers and creeks to make sure that litter products like bottles, plastic bags and other wastes are prevented from being washed into rivers and seas.

Storm water drains run out bound to unauthorized workers as getting in storm water drains is generally prohibited and extremely unsafe. Conditions in a drain can alter without warning as water levels might rise unexpectedly even on a dry sunny day as rainwater can show up all of a sudden even having fallen lots of kilometers away.

While a lot of storm water drains are covered by grilles and grates, not all stormwater drains pipes can be covered as this would restrict the water flow in certain locations due to the accumulation of debris and litter which ultimately causes flooding.

Jonite Architectural Trench (Channel) Gratings

At Jonite, our stone reinforced channel grates (trench grates) have redefined the role of gratings (drain covers) in the architecture industry. With Jonite channel gratings (trench gratings), drain covers are more than functional products – we incorporated world class design into our Jonite range of channel gratings.

Jonite channel grating (trench grating) absorbs much less heat than traditional ferrous gratings, making it a more comfortable material to have around the house and in children’s playgrounds. In addition, it has dielectric properties equivalent to porcelain, making it an excellent electric insulator as well. Jonite Stone (reinforced) Channel Grates are engineered to sustain load performances from pedestrian to vehicular according to the standard as specified, and are compliant with International standards such as BS EN 124:1994 & BS EN 1433:2008.

The unique material properties of Jonite driveway drain channel driveway drain grates products which prevent rust and corrosion mean they are equally suited to last a lifetime for both indoor and outdoor applications.

As a brand that goes beyond chasing profits relentlessly, not everything can be measured in dollars and cents. Jonite believes everyone should do their part for the environment. Going after green and sustainable development is part of our corporate DNA. Through the LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) green building certification programme, the U.S. Green Building Council is transforming the built environment. As a member of the USGBC and with the usage of recycled content, Jonite products contribute toward satisfying MR Credit 4: Recycled Content under LEED®. The LEED® Green Building Rating System is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high-performance green building in the U.S.A.

Green Architecture

Green architecture, philosophy of architecture that advocates sustainable energy sources, the preservation of energy, the reuse and safety of building structure materials, and the siting of a building with consideration of its effect on the environment.

In the early 21st century the building structure of shelter (in all its types) consumed over half of the world’s resources– translating into 16 percent of the Earth’s freshwater resources, 30– 40 percent of all energy supplies, and 50 percent by weight of all the raw materials withdrawn from Earth’s surface. Architecture was likewise responsible for 40– 50 percent of waste deposits in land fills and 20– 30 percent of greenhouse gas emissions.

Numerous architect designers after the post-World War II building boom were content to put up emblematic civic and corporate icons that celebrated profligate consumption and omnivorous globalization. At the turn of the 21st century, nevertheless, a building structure’s environmental integrity– as seen in the way it was designed and how it ran– ended up being an essential consider how it was assessed.

By the mid-1980s and continuing through the ’90s, the variety of environmental advocacy societies radically broadened; groups such as Greenpeace, Environmental Action, the Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth, and the Nature Conservancy all experienced growing subscriptions. For designers and builders a substantial milestone was the formula in 1994 of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) requirements, established and administered by the U.S. Green Building Council. These standards offered quantifiable criteria for the design and construction of ecologically accountable buildings.